HUNTING GROUSE WITH A PRIMITIVE, FLINTLOCK, SMOOTHBORE

12187680_10206244744131760_7610003510698002158_n12143101_10206244745611797_808634616975310863_nYesterday I shot this beautiful ruffed grouse with a contemporary copy of a flintlock, 20 gauge, smoothbore, firearm.  It was loaded with 70 grains of 2F (black) powder, topped by wadding from a wasps nest (no wasps were hurt in the loading sequence,) and an equal volume of lead shot held in place with more wasp nest wadding.  My research has shown that all different sorts of wadding material were used in historic, smoothbore firearms.  This included cloth, leather, paper, wool scraps, even grass.  All work well enough and were readily available.  Our family dogs, who haven’t realized they are not bred to hunt, 12193400_10206244748531870_8998207938735842222_n

scared up this grouse and I was able to shoot it at a distanced of about 15 yards.  The gun used is a copy of a type of firearm historians label as a “Carolina gun or Type G, trade gun.”  Whatever I hunt, I eat, and grouse makes for a good meal.  The gun was made by contemporary gun builder Mike Brooks and I have used it successfully on many different game hunts, including deer.

2 thoughts on “HUNTING GROUSE WITH A PRIMITIVE, FLINTLOCK, SMOOTHBORE

    • Sorry Zac for the late response. Unfortunately, I did make a video of this, but I can tell you I hunt often with this firearm and it has been loads of fun.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.